Cooking for Mom-to-be: a nutrient bomb with trout

A nutrient bomb with trout

A nutrient bomb with trout

This Dad-to-be likes to cook. So, I’m already looking forward to making wonderful meals for baby when the time for eating from a spoon has come. One of the pleasures of that, is that I’m looking around for a good food processor. I need a new one anyway, and this is a good moment to invest a bit in a great kitchen tool. If there’s someone who has some advice, that would be welcome.

In the mean time, Mom-to-be is the one I’m preparing extra healthy and tasty dishes for. And that took a bit getting used to. What are safe foods during pregnancy, which are also giving the best nutrients for baby and are tasty, too? Fortunately, there’s a lot of great information out there on the web. Such as which fatty fish are good. You can not just serve Mom-to-be any sort of fish. You have to be careful with those that are high up there in the food chain. Such as my favorite fish: tuna. Too much mercury in that one, so a no go for Mom-to-be.

Anyway, one fish I found on the list was trout. I only made a dish with that once (not a big success), and I thought it would be nice to give the fish a second chance. From a wonderful looking recipe I found online, I created this super healthy good nutrient bomb of a dish. Almost every element in it, maybe apart from the regular potatoes, contains nutrients that are good for Mom-to-be and for baby in this sauteed trout on a mash of potatoes and sweet potatoes, assorted beans with a bit of carrot, topped off with roasted almond shavings and crispy coppa.

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Drink from the garden: holunder syrup

Elderflower in the garden

Elderflower in the garden

In a corner of the garden of my childhood home, almost like it was hiding, we had an elder tree. When it was in bloom, it would have wonderful parachutes full of flowers. I really liked it. But, just as with the rhubarb we had in our garden, I did not really care for the taste of it. My mother often made elderflower syrup, and its distinct taste was something I didn’t really get used to in the beginning. Contrary to the rhubarb, though, eventually this was a taste that I acquired.

On irregular intervals, the elder tree would come back into my life. Like that period I lived in a street named after it. Or now, in Germany, where during bloom season you not just see the Holunder – as Germans call it – everywhere, but during the whole year you can taste it everywhere. Mostly in drinks. From syrups to beer derivatives (sorry, but I’m not sure yet what else to call Fassbrau). And of course in the summer cocktail from Austria, the Hugo.
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Eating from the garden: rhubarb-sage compote

New stalks are already sprouting on our rhubarb plant

New stalks are already sprouting on our rhubarb plant

Having a garden is a lot of work: mowing the grass, trimming the trees, taking out the parasitic weeds that want to ruin everything. But, it’s also a great joy. What I always thought of, when thinking of living in a house with a garden, was to have at least some edible things growing in it. So, when we made our trip to one of those garden centers recently, we bought several herbs to plant. And some strawberries. The herbs I can use already, the strawberries we have to wait a bit for. Fortunately, there were already some plants growing in the garden, that are meant for consumption. One is a sage bush, that was placed in a not very nice looking pot sort of thing, and I replanted in a small sunny patch of the garden, right next to the rhubarb. Now, we used to have rhubarb in the garden when I grew up, and my mother used to make all sorts of things with it. I just never liked the taste of it. Still, after replanting the sage (and smelling the scents of it), I felt I could try to make something that combined the sage with the rhubarb. There were quite a few stalks growing from the red thing already, and the smell of the few branches of the sage bush that broke off during replanting somehow made me think this could be a great match.

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